Friday 9 March 2018 – Standard Contracts as Pathways to Global Markets – the Experience of the London Corn Trade Association (1880-1914) by Professor Jérôme Sgard

Standard Contracts as Pathways to Global Markets – the Experience of the London Corn Trade Association (1880-1914)

Friday, 9 March 2018 / 14.00 – 16.30

Professor Jérôme Sgard

(Professor, Sciences Po Ecole de Droit)

Commodity markets were typically governed during the first global era (ca 1870-1914) by private, London-based “Trade Associations”, managed by a small number of top market insiders. One of their key contribution was to write and constantly adjust a set of Standard Contracts, tailored to each specific commodity and to each country or port of origin. These contracts followed the English contract law and were confirmed and eventually enforced by English courts. But such intervention proved extremely rate, just as, more generally the support from government authorities when dealing with foreign countries or authorities. No concern whatsoever was shown either for rules of international law (private or public). Hence, private ordering on a trade basis and self-enforcement worked pretty well within an overall geopolitical order that was clearly imperialist and hegemonic.

 

Friday 9 March, 2018

Meeting Room, Ecole de Droit, 14.00 – 16.30

4th floor (room 410T), 13 rue de l’université, 75007 Paris

IMPORTANT:

Due to security measures, access to Sciences Po buildings is restricted.

If you intend to attend the seminar, please send an email to filipe.silva@sciencespo.fr indicating your full name. Security officers will be provided with the list of participants.

Do not forget to bring a VALID ID.

Friday 23 February 2018 – Constitutional Geography and Geopolitics by Professor Günter Frankenberg

Constitutional Geography and Geopolitics

Professor Günter Frankenberg
(Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main – Institute for Public Law)

Partition comes neither naturally nor happens by accident. It results from bitter controversy. War, civil war and occupation often precede territorial separation. Whereas liberation struggles are likely to inspire secession on the part of separatist movements, political division may be the upshot of strategic plans devised by occupying powers and colonial regimes and is liable to be charted in geographical and geopolitical terms. I will discuss models of constitutional geography and constitutional narratives covering or denying partition.

Friday February 23rd, 2018
14.45 – 16.45
Sciences Po, 9 rue de la Chaise, 75007 Paris, Room 933

IMPORTANT: 
Due to security measures, access to Sciences Po buildings is restricted.
If you intend to attend the seminar, please send an email to filipe.silva@sciencespo.fr 
indicating your full name. Security officers will be provided with the list of participants.  

Do not forget to bring a VALID ID.

Historical Capitalism and International Law – Colloque Junior du CIERA – Young Scholars’ Conference Program

Sciences Po, 18 and 19 January 2018

IMPORTANT: If you intend to attend the conference, please register at: https://www.eventbrite.fr/e/historical-capitalism-and-international-law-tickets-41426110612

Conference venues access:

Amphithéâtre Erignac (13, rue de l’Université) – Building J

Salle Goguel (56, rue des Saints Pères) – Building B, access through building A (27, rue Saint Guillaume)

Metro stations nearby: Saint-Germain-des-Prés, line 4 Sèvres-Babylone, lines 10 and 12 Rue du Bac, line 12

Thursday, 18 January 2018 Amphithéâtre Erignac (13, rue de l’Université –Paris 7ème)

12:30 – 13:00 Conference registration

13:00 – 13:30 Presentation and welcome notes

13:30 – 15:00 Keynote address : Rémi Bachand, Law Professor at Université du Québec à Montréal, “Capitalism, Imperialism and International Law”

15:00 – 15:15 Coffee break

15:15 – 17:15 Nikolas Karmis, Paris II Panthéon-Assas, “The Ideological Interpretation of the Article 16 of the Covenant of the League of Nations by the German Doctrine” Eric Loefflad, University of Kent, “Occupation, Civilisation, and the Protection of European Property: A World-Historical Perspective on the International Illegality of Territorial Conquest” Commentator: Sören Zimmermann, Goethe-Universität, Frankfurt/M

17:15 – 17:30 Coffee break

17:30 – 19:30 Kanad Bagchi, Max Planck Institute for Comparative Public Law and International Law, “To Capital Controls and Back: Re-Embedding Global Capitalism Through International Law” Johanna Gautier, Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies, “Financial Deregulation in the 1980s-1990s: A New Market for Territorial and Institutional Competition” Commentator: Robin Caballero, Humboldt Universität zu Berlin / Paris I Panthéon-Sorbonne

20:00 Dinner

Friday, 19 January 2018 Salle Goguel (56, rue des Saints Pères – Paris 7ème)

9:00 – 11:00 Aikaterini Grymaneli, Université Paris II Panthéon-Assas, “Capitalism Expansion and the Law of the Sea: The Example of the Exploitation and Conservation of Areas Beyond National Jurisdiction” Dudi Rulliadi, Melbourne Law School, “From Dutch Colonialism to US Developmentalism: Capitalism and the Dynamics of Indonesian Law and Policy on Economic Development from Independence to the New Order Era” Commentator: Milan Tahraoui, Max Planck Institute for Comparative Public Law and International Law

11:00 – 11:15 Coffee break

11:15 – 13:15 Olaoye Kehinde Folake, Chinese University of Hong Kong, “Empire, Capital and Protection of Foreign Investment: Historical Origins of Transnational Investment Law in Africa” Anam Soomro, Berlin Graduate School for Transnational Studies, “A Critical Inquiry into Freedom of Movement: Race, Colonialism and the Making of International Law” Commentator: Tim Wihl, Humboldt Universität zu Berlin

13:15 – 14:30 Lunch

14:30 – 16:30 Filipe Antunes Madeira da Silva, Sciences Po Law School, “How the Putumayo Was Won: Sovereignty and Property in the Rubber Lands” Claire Debucquois, Columbia Law School, “Braudel in Brazil: The Merchant, the Prince, and the [Law of the] Land” Commentator: Alberto Rinaldi, Sciences Po Law School

16:30 – 16:45 Coffee break

16:45 – 19:00 Interdisciplinary round-table : “Franco-German Looks into Historical Capitalism and International Law : Exploring Geographical and Disciplinary Boundaries” Discussants: Monique Chemillier-Gendrau (To be confirmed – Professeure émérite, Université Paris Diderot – Paris 7), Pierre Gervais (Université Sorbonne Nouvelle – Paris 3), Claire Lemercier (Centre de Sociologie des Organisations – Sciences Po) and Ingo Venske (Universiteit Van Amsterdam)

REMINDER – Last Pilagg conference of 2017 is taking place TODAY

Dear fellow Pilaggists and private international law enthusiasts,

As you might know, our last Pilagg conference of 2017 is taking place TODAY! This will be a very special occasion indeed, not only because we will say goodbye to the (very productive) Pilagg year 2017, but more importantly, because we will have two speakers who will address the fascinating and topical issue of Legal Constructions of Space and Forms of Life.

Veronica Corcodel and Toni Marzal, both members of the FOLIE group will talk about Legally constructed migrant forms of life (with a focus on the Calais camps) and the Territorial scope of application of the EU law.

So, save the date, and make sure you attend the seminar! If enough people are interested, the discussion can continue after the official end-time, with a nice glass of mulled wine. We are looking forward to seeing you all!

Friday, December 15th, 2017 / 14.00 – 17.00

École de droit, Sciences Po, 13 rue de l’Université, 75007 Paris

Meeting Room (4th floor – room 410T)

IMPORTANT:

Due to security measures, access to Sciences Po buildings is restricted.

If you intend to attend the seminar, please send an email to filipe.silva@sciencespo.fr

indicating your full name. Security officers will be provided with the list of participants.

Do not forget to bring a VALID ID.

Friday, 15 December – Joint seminar on Legal Constructions of Space and Forms of Life by Toni Marzal and Veronica Corcodel

Joint seminar on Legal Constructions of Space and Forms of Life

Friday, December 15th 2017 / 14.00 – 17.00

 

Antonio Marzal

Maître de Conférences à la Sorbonne & Member of FOLIE

&

Veronica Corcodel

Postdoctoral Fellow at Sciences Po & Member of FOLIE

 

Antonio Marzal: FOLIE and the territorial scope of application of EU law

The topic I have chosen to examine from the perspective of FOLIE is that of the territorial scope of application of EU law. At its simplest, it is the issue that arises where a situation is only partially or even tenuously connected to the European territory, or where it is connected both to the EU and the legal systems of third States. Problems in this area, like in many others, are solved by relying on universal values, by conceiving EU law as a vector for those values, and by guaranteeing its effectiveness. This means that, in principle, territoriality plays very little role. Rather than firmly grounded in a certain geography or a localised community, EU law possesses the abstract qualities of pure movement or energy: its effects are certainly felt locally, but EU law itself has no such grounding. If we take seriously, however, the ideas behind FOLIE project (that is, that EU law is necessarily local, that it is both reflective and constitutive of a way of life), it becomes possible to turn this area of the law upside down and show, not only that the question of the applicability of EU law can be alternatively understood as who is and who is out and what it means to be an insider, but furthermore that the EU law already is based on such an understanding, even if reluctantly and vaguely articulated and seeking cover under the convenient language of values, extraterritoriality and effet utile”.

 

Veronica Corcodel: Legally constructed migrant forms of life: Calais as a space of contested suspension

This presentation will explore the relationship between law and migrant lives through the example of the Calais camp. It will start with a reflection on how the notion of forms of life, developed mainly in philosophical and literary works, can be useful for approaching this question. Defined as a bundle of socially and culturally shaped practices that constitute – and are constituted by – ways of living, this notion puts in the forefront the issue of life possibilities. If law is to be understood as one of these practices, the idea of forms of life allows tackling the relationship between law and migrants’ projects of social and economic lives in “foreign” countries. In the context of the Calais camp, as this presentation will show, legal arrangements both consolidate the suspension of migrants’ life projects and allow contesting it. In this sense, Calais appears as a legally constructed space of contested suspension. Such a vision runs counter reductive understandings of the camp as created “outside law” or as merely oppressive.

 

Friday, December 15th, 2017 / 14.00 – 17.00

École de droit, Sciences Po, 13 rue de l’Université, 75007 Paris

Meeting Room (4th floor – room 410T)

 IMPORTANT:

Due to security measures, access to Sciences Po buildings is restricted.

If you intend to attend the seminar, please send an email to filipe.silva@sciencespo.fr

indicating your full name. Security officers will be provided with the list of participants.

Do not forget to bring a VALID ID.

Friday, 24th November 2017 – What is legal knowledge? By Prof. Geoffrey Samuel

Friday, November 24th 2017 / 14.30 – 16.30

Professor Geoffrey Samuel

(Kent Law School & Sciences Po Paris)

 What is legal knowledge? In tackling this question, this seminar will be a response to an imaginary request from the editor of a work on social science epistemology who would like to see in the edited book a contribution from law. Prof. Samuel will assert that arguments about the nature of legal knowledge cannot be resolved in any definitive way by a legal or social science epistemologist. This may seem surprising given that there are solid core texts – statutes and cases – a range of which have to be known in order to qualify as a lawyer or (and) jurist. Yet it is the scholarship on and around these texts which proves problematic.

How, then, would a chapter on law in an edited work on social science epistemology read? Arguably it would reveal a series of tensions that exist within the discipline of law around which knowledge issues are debated. These tensions can be summed up in four dichotomies: (1) diachronic versus synchronic; (2) formalism versus realism (construed widely); (3) law versus law-makers; and (4) authority paradigm versus inquiry paradigm. Perhaps there are more than four, but many other tensions can be seen as cross-currents and under-currents within these four generic groupings. One other issue stands out. If jurists are to be taken seriously by those in other disciplines law must be seen not just to profit from epistemological scholarship in general but actively to contribute to this general scholarship. How might it do this? There is no easy answer, but a number of responses will be raised at the seminar.

Discussant: Catalina Avasilencei

 Friday November 24th, 2017

Meeting Room, Ecole de Droit, 14.30 – 16.30

4th floor (room 410T), 13 rue de l’université, 75007 Paris

 

IMPORTANT:

Due to security measures, access to Sciences Po buildings is restricted.

If you intend to attend the seminar, please send an email to filipe.silva@sciencespo.fr indicating your full name. Security officers will be provided with the list of participants.

Do not forget to bring a VALID ID.

Le Droit Talmudique Saisi Par Le Droit Comparé – 22 et 23 novembre 2017

Nancy – 22 & 23 novembre 2017 – amphi AR06

LE DROIT TALMUDIQUE SAISI PAR LE DROIT COMPARÉ

Inscription pour cet événement est obligatoire.

  • Tarif: 70 euro (gratuit pour les étudiants)
  • Bulletin d’inscription à nous retourner à l’adresse suivante : ifg-contact@univ-lorraine.fr ou
  • Institut François Gény, 13 place Carnot, C.O.70026, 54035 Nancy cedex

 

PREMIÈRE JOURNÉE

13h00

Ouverture : Stefan GOLTZBERG, Chercheur au Centre Perelman de Philosophie du Droit, Bruxelles, Charles LEBEN, Professeur émérite de l’Université Paris II, François-Xavier LICARI, Maître de conférences-HDR à l’Université de Lorraine

 

13h30

Conférence inaugurale : Michaël WYGODA, Docteur en droit, Directeur du Département de droit hébraïque, Ministère de la Justice israélien : « Les limites de l’engagement contractuel en droit talmudique et comparé – force majeure et imprévision »

 

14h00

Pause café

 

14h15

SILENCE ET PAROLES DU JUGE

David MAMAN, Talmudiste, Rabbin de Deauville : « Déni de justice et interprétation de la loi dans le Talmud »

Daniel DAHAN, Docteur en droit, Grand-Rabbin d’Aix-en-Provence : « Un secret absolu ? Le secret des délibérations de justice en droit talmudique et en droit français ».

Georges HANSEL, Professeur émérite de l’Université de Rouen : « La preuve en droit talmudique »

 

16h00

Pause café

 

16h30

STATUT DU CORPS

Raphaël ETTEDGUI, Avocat au Barreau de Strasbourg : « La relation de travail en droit français et en droit talmudique »

Ariel REBIBO, Talmudiste, Rabbin de Thionville : « La vente de biens meubles corporels en droit talmudique et en droit français »

Kevin LÉVY, Doctorant à l’Université Paris I : « Essai sur le concept de “déséquilibre significatif” à l’aune du droit talmudique »

 

17h15

Pause café

 

17h30

SERMENT ET CONFESSION

Noémie ISSAN-BENCHIMOL, Doctorante à l’École Pratique des Hautes Études : « Fonction pragmatique du serment en droit talmudique, à la lumière du droit canon. Le cas de la shevuat modé bemiqtsat en droit monétaire (dinei mamonot) ».

Alexandre STYLIOS, Professeur à l’Université Laval, Québec : « Les possibles racines juives du droit des confessions en common law ».

 

SECONDE JOURNÉE

 

09h00

DROIT NATUREL ET CAS DIFFICILES

Rémy SCIALOM, Maître de conférences-HDR à l’Université d’Aix-Marseille : « Perspectives juridiques hébraïques sur le droit naturel »

Anton Mordecai KANEVSKIY, Docteur en droit, Assistant à l’Université d’Etat Lomonosov de Moscou : « Les cas difficiles : Dworkin et le Talmud »

 

09h45

Pause café

 

10h00

PRINCIPES D’INTERPRÉTATION

David LEMLER, Docteur en philosophie, enseignant au Département d’études hébraïques et juives, Université de Strasbourg : « Asmakhta (droit talmudique) et Ishāra (droit musulman) : l’usage stratégique des versets, du raisonnement halakhique à l’exégèse philosophique »

Liliane VANA, Docteur en sciences des religions, Professeure associée à l’IEJ, Université Libre de Bruxelles : « ‘Les commandements positifs liés au temps – les femmes en sont dispensées’ (M Qiddushin 1,7). Est-ce bien une règle ? »

 

Pause déjeuner libre

 

14h00

ÉVOLUTION DES SOURCES

Emmanuel BLOCH, Doctorant à l’Université Hébraïque de Jérusalem : « Les normes de la pudeur : quelques réflexions en vue d’une approche comparatiste des sources du droit talmudique »

Mikhaël BENADMON, Docteur en philosophie, Maître de conférences en philosophie juive et générale, Collège Académique Herzog, Jérusalem : « La topographie des cimetières : évolution des sources du droit »

Yaacov GARSON, Avocat au Barreau de Jérusalem : « Le précédent en droit talmudique, anglais et israélien ».

 

15h45

Pause café

 

16h00

Conclusions et débat

The Production of Imperial Space: Empire and Circulations (18th-20th Centuries)

THE PRODUCTION OF IMPERIAL SPACE: EMPIRE AND CIRCULATIONS (18th-20th Centuries)

Colloque junior (CHSP/Ecole doctorale de Sciences Po)

Date: November 23-24, 2017

Location: CHSP, 56 rue Jacob, 75006 Paris Salle du Traité

Organisation:

  • Camille BUAT | Sciences Po-CHSP/University of Göttingen
  • Aude-Cécile MONNOT | Sciences Po-CHSP
  • Alexander VAN WICKEREN | University of Cologne/Sciences Po-CHSP

Scientific Committee:

  • Ravi AHUJA | University of Göttingen/CeMIS – Sabine DULLIN | Sciences Po-CHSP
  • Ulrike LINDNER | University of Cologne – Paul-André ROSENTAL | Sciences Po
  • CHSP/ESOPP – Jakob VOGEL | Sciences Po-CHSP

En raison des normes de sécurité accrues,
il est impératif de s’inscrire à cette manifestation.
Si vous êtes intéressé.e, veuillez envoyer un courriel (colloquium.circulation@gmail.com)

Programme:

Thursday, November 23, 2017

09:30 • Welcoming the Participants and Registration 10:00-10:30 • Introduction

10:30-12:00 • PANEL 1: Imaginations of Spaces: Explorations and Discourses in an Imperial Setting – Discussant: Jakob VOGEL (Sciences Po-CHSP)

  • KATHERINE PARKER (Barry Lawrence Ruderman Antique Maps London) | “Putting Space to Paper. The Production of the Pacific in the Eighteenth Century”
  • DELPHINE FROMENT (ENS Ulm) | “A Scramble for Kilimanjaro? Imperial Rivalries and Production of Space in East Africa at the end fo the 19th century”
  • MARTA GRZECHNIK (University of Gdánsk) | “Aspirations of an Imperial Space. The Colonial Discourse of the Maritime and Colonial League in Interwar Poland”

12:00-13:30 • LUNCH BREAK

13:30-15:00 • PANEL 2
From Railway to Television: Imperial Space and Infrastructure –
Discussant: Vidhya RAVEENDRANATHAN (University of Göttingen/CeMIS)

  • MATTHEW SCOTT (Newcastle University) | “Visions of Circulation. Continental Imperial Expan- sion and the Construction of Transcontinental Railway Systems, c. 1850-1930”
  • LIMIN TEH (Leiden University) | “The Company Town as Imperial Space”
  • FLORA LOSCH (EHESS Paris) | “Broadcast and Rule: The Circulation of Audiovisual Knowledge and Technologies and the De/Re-composition of the Imperial Space in West Africa”

15:00-15:30 • COFFEE BREAK

15:30-17:00 • PANEL 3
Ordering Mobilities within Imperial Spaces – Discussant: Sabine DULLIN (Sciences Po- CHSP)

  • HUW J. DAVIES (King’s College London) | “Networks of Knowledge Exchange and Information Circulations in Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century British Military Imperialism”
  • ZHANNA POPOVA (International Institute of Social History Amsterdam) | “Exile to Siberia as Imperial Practice, 1870s-1900s”
  • TOM MENGER (University of Cologne) | “‘Ordinary’ Colonial Officers in German East Africa as Pawns and Producers of Imperial Space and Imperial Circulations, ca. 1890-1914”

20:00 • EVENING ACTIVITIES

 

Friday, November 24, 2017

09:30-11:00 • PANEL 4
Flows of commodities and currencies: Imperial Economic Spaces – Discussant: Claude MARKOVITS (CNRS-CEIAS)

  • JÉSUS BOHORQUEZ BARRERA (University of Lisbon) | “Entangled Geographies of the Iberian Empires in South America (1750-1800)”
  • VARSHA PATEL (University of Kassel) | “Reconfiguring Routes of Salt along the British Indian Frontier of Maritime Saurāshtra, Western India 1910-1932”
  • ADITYA RAMESH (SOAS, London) | “Circulating Commodities, Shifting Sovereignties: Rice across the Bay of Bengal c. 1900-1947”

11:00-11:30 • COFFEE BREAK

11:30-13:00 • PANEL 5
Trajectories and experiences of circulating people: Empire’s multilayered space – Discussant: David DO PAÇO (Sciences Po-CHSP)

  • METIN ATMACA (Social Sciences University of Ankara) | “An Imperial Social Space with Many Layers. Reconfiguration of the Ottoman-Iranian Frontier by Khaliddiya Sufi Network”
  • MARTIN SCHALLER (University of St. Andrews) | “Travellers Habsburg Empire – One Imperial Space or Different Spaces? Ca. 1815-1860s
  • ANDREI DAN SORESCU (University College London) | “The Peddler, the Peasant and the Portrait of the Czar. Spatial Layers of Empire in fin-de-siècle Romania “

13:00-14:00 • LUNCH BREAK

14:00-15:30 • PANEL 6
Transimperial spaces: places on the move and nodes of circulation – Discussant: Ulrike LINDNER (University of Cologne)

  • JUSTINE COUSIN (Paris IV) | “Colonial Seafarers creating a Trans-imperial Space. British Empire and Steamship Labour Circulations (1850-1950)”
  • FLORIAN WAGNER (University of Erfurt) | “The International Colonial Institute and the Creation of a Transimperial Space of Colonial Science (1890s-1920s)

15:30-16:00 • COFFEE BREAK

16:00-17:00 • FINAL ROUNDTABLE

Friday 13th October – Sex, Boardrooms and Transnational Corporate Space: When Does Board Diversity Benefit Firms? by Darren Rosenblum

Friday, October 13th 2017 / 14.00 – 16.30

Meeting room (410T), Ecole de Droit, 13 rue de l’université 

By DARREN ROSENBLUM (Professor of Law, Pace Law School)

Firms embrace diversity, but vague predictions of a “diversity dividend” leave regulators and market actors unclear about what specific benefits to expect. In this seminar, Prof. Rosenblum will argue that we can only assess how sex diversity leads to improved performance by understanding the who, what, and where of diversity’s benefit. Whether sex diversity produces a “diversity dividend” depends on three key factors: (1) the nature of the benefit of including women (whether their experience or other qualities); (2) the kind of firm and its governance; and (3) the jurisdiction(s) in which the firm operates.

Only by further investigating the precise conditions under which diversity will have an effect can we estimate sex diversity’s potential instrumental benefits. This seminar melds corporate governance theory with critical gender analysis to explain how firms worldwide are attempting to incorporate sex diversity, and when these efforts may prove fruitful.

To access the full version of Prof. Rosenblum’s article, please contact lucia.bizikova@sciencespo.fr

IMPORTANT:

Due to security measures, access to Sciences Po buildings is restricted. If you intend to attend the seminar, please send an email to filipe.silva@sciencespo.fr indicating your full name. Security officers will be provided with the list of participants.

Do not forget to bring a VALID ID.

Friday 20th October – Bringing it home: Are Canadian courts suddenly opening up to corporate liability for extra-territorial violations of human rights? by Geneviève Saumier

SCIENCES PO ECOLE DE DROIT: SEMINAIRE DE PILAGG

Bringing it home: Are Canadian courts suddenly opening up to corporate liability for extra-territorial violations of human rights?  

Professor Geneviève Saumier (McGill University)

Discussant: Fabien Marchandier

Friday October 20th, 2017; Room 931, 14.45 – 16.45; C-building, 9 rue de la Chaise, 75007 Paris

Abstract: The Third Pillar of the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights prescribes that States must provide access to an effective judicial remedy to address business-related human rights abuses. Denial of access can result from either procedural or substantive barriers. Where the alleged human rights abuse took place in a foreign State, jurisdiction rules may exclude claims against foreign defendants or a court may decline to exercise jurisdiction on forum non conveniens grounds. Even if those procedural barriers can be overcome, substantive obstacles may remain if the claim depends on “piercing the corporate veil” or if the foreign applicable law provides no cause of action. These are well-known and well-documented blind spots of the private international regimes that govern cross-border litigation and that have stood in the way of remedies for corporate violations of human rights.

Canadian corporations have a poor reputation in terms of corporate violations of human rights abroad, most specifically in the extractive industry. A 2009 study revealed that Canadian mining companies had been involved in 33% of worldwide cases of alleged human rights and environmental violations over the preceding ten-year period. While the Canadian government has since sought to address this through a CSR Strategy targeted at the extractive sector, its approach has had no direct implications for access to judicial remedies. This marks a legislative blind spot, since attempts by foreign claimants to seek redress before Canadian courts during the same period had failed, often on jurisdictional grounds, but occasionally also on substantive grounds.

Despite this bleak landscape for corporate social responsibility, there are indications that the tide may be turning. A series of recent decisions by Canadian courts have reversed course, refusing to decline jurisdiction under forum non conveniens and allowing novel claims for direct liability of parent companies for acts of their foreign subsidiaries to go forward. This optimistic development is tempered by the fact that none of these decisions have moved beyond the preliminary stages and most are currently under appeal. Moreover, a recent decision, flowing from the Rana Plaza tragedy, refused to extend this newly-discovered openness to a claim based on supply chains.

The presentation will explore this evolving Canadian jurisprudence, assessing what might appear to be judicial activism in the face of legislative inertia, and analysing the impact it is already having on corporate behaviour by Canadian parent companies.

IMPORTANT:

Due to security measures, access to Sciences Po buildings is restricted.

If you intend to attend the seminar, please send an email to filipe.silva@sciencespo.fr indicating your full name. Security officers will be provided with the list of participants.

Do not forget to bring a VALID ID.