2016 ASADIP Meeting, University of Buenos Aires, 10 – 11 November

2016 ASADIP Meeting

Asociación Americana de Derecho Internacional Privado organised the 2016 Meeting hosted by the University of Buenos Aires, on 10 – 11 November 2016. The opening keynote lecture on the topic “Do the Hague Principles on Choice of Law in International Commercial Contracts bring any change?” given by Professor Katharina Boele-Woelki, Dean of Bucerius Law School, was introduced by Professor Diego P. Fernández Arroyo from Sciences Po Ecole de Droit. 

 

Program

Wednesday, November 9

20:00 – Cocktail offered by The Hague Conference on Private International Law

 

Thursday, November 10

8:45 – 9:00 – Welcome remarks

  • Mónica Pinto (Buenos Aires, Head of Law School of University of Buenos Aires (UBA).
  • José A. Moreno Rodríguez (Asunción, President of ASADIP)

9:00 – 9:30 – Opening keynote lecture

Katharina Boele-Woelki (Hamburg): “Do the Hague Principles on Choice of Law in International Commercial Contracts bring any change?”

Introduced by Diego P. Fernández Arroyo (Paris)

9:30 – 11:00 – Debate: Who fears non-state legislation for the regulation of international contracts? 

  • Ralf Michaels (Duke)
  • Lauro Gama Jr (Rio de Janeiro)
  • Geneviève Saumier (Montreal)
  • Eugenio Hernández-Bretón (Caracas)

Moderated by Francisco Amallo (Buenos Aires)

11:00 – 11.30 – Break

11:30 – 12:45 – Regulation of international contracts: different options in recent Latin American legislation

  • Pablo Debuchy (Asunción)
  • María Elsa Uzal (Buenos Aires)
  • Gilberto Boutin (Panama)
  • Carlos Odriozola Mariscal (Mexico City)

Moderated by Virginia Aguilar (Mexico City)

12:45 – 14:45 – Lunch

14:45 – 16:15 – The future of international regulation of international contracts

  • Mario A. Oyarzábal (Buenos Aires)
  • Hans van Loon (The Hague)
  • José Angelo Estrella Faria (UNIDROIT, Rome)
  • Sandrine Clavel (Versailles)

Moderated by Dante Negro (Washington DC – OAS)

16:15 – 16:45 – Break

16:45 – 18:15 – Debate: Is the 1980 Vienna Convention on Contracts for the CISG properly applied?

  • Alejandro M. Garro (New York)
  • Alberto Zuppi (Buenos Aires)
  • Franco Ferrari (New York)
  • Jorge Oviedo Albán (Bogota)
  • Carolina Iud (Buenos Aires)

Moderated by José Luis Marín (Medellín)

18:15 – 19:15 – Contractualization of secured transactions

  • Spyridon Bazinas (Vienna, UNCITRAL)
  • Paula María All (Santa Fe)

Moderated by Daniela Vargas (Río de Janeiro)

19:15 – Cocktail offered by the Law School of the University of Buenos Aires (UBA)              

  

Friday, November 11 

09:30 – 11:00 – Interpretation of international contracts by judges and arbitrators

  • María Susana Najurieta (Buenos Aires)
  • Paul Arrighi (Montevideo)
  • Cristian Conejero Roos (Santiago)
  • María Lilia Díaz Cordero (Buenos Aires)

Moderated by Verónica Sandler Obregón (Buenos Aires)

11:00 – 11:30 – Break

11:30 – 13:00 – Debate: Judges or arbitrators for the resolution of international contractual disputes?

  • Eduardo Vescovi (Montevideo)
  • Marilda Rosado (Rio de Janeiro)
  • José Alfredo Martínez de Hoz (h) (Buenos Aires)
  • Pedro Saghy (Caracas)
  • Margie Jaime (Panama)

Moderated by Máximo Bomchil (Buenos Aires)

13:00 – 15:00 – Lunch

15:00 – 16:30 – Weak parties and contractual balance

  • Claudia Madrid Martínez (Caracas)
  • Juan José Obando (San José)
  • Mariela Rabino (Buenos Aires)
  • Luciane Klein Vieira (Campinas)
  • Paula Serra Freire (Caracas)
  • Juan José Cerdeira (Buenos Aires)

Moderated by Ana Elizabeth Villalta (San Salvador)

16:30 – 17:00 – Break

17:00 – 18:30 – Debate: Are there or should there be “Latin American” specificities in the law of international contracts?

  • Julio César Rivera (Buenos Aires)
  • Nadia de Araujo (Rio de Janeiro)
  • Roberto Ruiz Díaz Labrano (Asunción)
  • Aníbal Sierralta Ríos (Lima)
  • Pedro Mendoza Montano (Guatemala)

Moderated by Ricardo Acevedo Peralta (San Salvador)

18:30 – 19:00 – Closing keynote lecture:

Jürgen Basedow (Hamburg): “A theory of party autonomy”

Introduced by Didier Opertti Badán (Montevideo)

19:30 – Reception hosted by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Worship of Argentina

 

 

November 25th – Economic Transplants and Transnational Law: A Dialogue, by Katja Langenbucher and Brooke Adele Marshall

FRIDAY 25th November 2016, Prof. Katja Langenbucher (Sciences Po Ecole de Droit and Goethe-University’s House of Finance) & Brooke Adele Marshall (Senior Research Fellow, Max Planck Institute for Comparative and International Private Law)

 

Economic transplants as a common language? (Prof. Langenbucher)

Processes of “economization” have been observed and described by anthropologists, economists and sociologists (pars pro toto, see the work of Michel Callon). The presentation will focus on a related phenomenon in the world of legal research, law-making and adjudication which I address as “economic transplants“.

I will try, first, to capture reasons for the receptivity of lawyers and policymakers for “transplanting” findings based on economic methodology, both theoretical and empirical, into the law. Second, I shall ask if such “economic transplants“ live up to what they promise as far as legislative work is concerned. Third, economic transplants and the promises they hold are considered in the judicial context.

The presentation will rely on excerpts of a book forthcoming at CUP on “economic transplants“.

 

The CISG or the PICC as the governing law: normative ambiguities, dépeçage and the purportedly chosen law (Brooke Adele Marshall)

The Hague Principles on Choice of Law in International Commercial Contracts are “soft” private international law rules. They empower parties to choose either State law or soft “rules of law” to govern their contract, regardless of whether they litigate or arbitrate. This paper investigates the relationship between the Hague Principles and two sets of rules of law which parties may choose: the Unidroit Principles of International Commercial Contracts (PICC) or the United Nations Convention on Contracts for the International Sale of Goods (CISG). It makes three principal claims. First, the nature of the Hague Principles and their relationship with the PICC or the CISG gives rise to several normative ambiguities which need clarification. Second, the Hague Principles do not limit the parties’ ability to divide their contract at a choice of law level (horizontal dépeçage): parties can influence not only which rules of law govern the contract but also their content. This is undesirable as a matter of principle. It may also facilitate results which the PICC and the CISG do not intend. Third, the Hague Principles provide that the law which the parties purportedly chose determines whether the parties agreed on a choice of law. They also provide a mechanism which designates the law which the parties purportedly chose in standard contract terms. Applied to rules of law, the suitability of these provisions is questionable: alternatives should be explored.

 

When? Friday 25 November, 14:30 – 17:30

Where? at Sciences Po Ecole de Droit, 13 rue de l’université, 75007, Paris, Meeting Room (4th floor, room 410T)

International Conflict of Laws and The Third Restatement: Duke symposium, 4-5 November 2016

Duke Journal of Comparative & International Law

Duke Journal of Comparative & International Law is organising a symposium this weekend, on “International Conflict of Laws and the Third Restatement”. For more details, continue reading:

Overview

Writing in 2000, Mathias Reimann criticized the Second Restatement of Conflict of Laws for being “largely blind to international concerns.” He argued that since international conflict-of- laws issues have become routine, the next restatement of conflict of laws must be attentive to such issues and that, ideally, it would “come with an implied (or better yet express) warranty that all its principles and rules are fit for international use as well [as for domestic use].” With work on the Third Restatement of Conflict of Laws now underway—and with one of its goals being “to pay greater attention to the international context than the Second Restatement did”—it is time to give careful thought to Professor Reimann’s call for a genuinely international restatement. This conference will bring together leading scholars of conflict of laws to meet with the Third Restatement’s reporters to discuss how the reporters might best address international conflict-of- laws issues and take advantage of comparative methods in their work.

 

Program

Friday Nov 4:

1:00-2:00 – Lunch

2:00-2:30 – Introduction

  • 2:00-2:10 (DJCIL Welcome (Laura Revolinski)
  • 2:10-2:17 International and Comparative Aspects of Conflict of Laws: Ralf Michaels (Duke)
  • 2:18-2:25 International Conflict-of-Laws Issues and the Third Restatement: Chris Whytock (Associate Reporter; UC Irvine)

2:30-3:45 – Panel 1: Comparative Law and International Law in the New Restatement: Ralf  Michaels and Chris Whytock (Chairs)

  • Conflict of Laws Codifications: How might conflict-of-laws codifications around the world inform work on the Third Restatement? Symeon Symeonides (Willamette/NYU)
  • International Law and International Conflict of Laws: Donald Earl Childress III (Pepperdine)

4:15-5:45 – Panel 2: International versus Interstate Conflicts: TBD and Kim Roosevelt (Reporter; Pennsylvania), (Chairs)

  • Unilateralism versus Multilateralism in International Cases: Hannah Buxbaum (Indiana)

o Conflict of Laws in Supranational and Federal Systems: How might the experiences of the EU and national federal systems inform work on the Third Restatement, in particular regarding its treatment of interstate and international conflict-of-laws issues? Horatia Muir Watt (SciencesPo)

Saturday, Nov 5:

7:30-8:00 – Breakfast

8:00-10:00 – Panel 3—Specific Issues I: TBD and Chris Whytock (Associate Reporter; UC Irvine), Chairs

  • Jurisdiction: Linda Silberman (NYU)
  • Party Autonomy: Richard Fentiman
  • Torts and Contracts: Patrick Borchers (Creighton)

10:30-12:00 Panel 4—Specific International Conflict-of-Laws Issues II: TBD and Laura Little (Associate Reporter; Temple), Chairs

  • Family Law and Domestic Relations: Marriage and Divorce: Ann Laquer Estin (Iowa)
  • Family Law and Domestic Relations: Children: Louise Ellen Teitz (Roger Williams; Hague Conference)

12:15-1:00 – Closing Remarks with closing discussion: Mathias Reimann (Michigan)

1:00 – Lunch to go