Friday, 23 March – Epistemic Jurisdiction: Science, Expertise and Standardisation as Global Governance – by David Winickoff

Epistemic Jurisdiction: Science, Expertise and Standardisation as Global Governance

David Winickoff

Department of Environmental Science, Policy and Management, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, USA

While there is ample scholarly work on regulatory science within the state, or single-sited global institutions, there is less on its operation within complex modes of global governance that are decentered, overlapping, multi-sectorial and multi-leveled. Using a co-productionist framework, Prof. Winickoff will identifie ‘epistemic jurisdiction’ – the power to produce or warrant technical knowledge for a given political community, topical arena or geographical territory – as a central problem for regulatory science in complex governance. We explore these dynamics in the arena of global sustainability standards for biofuels. We select three institutional fora as sites of inquiry: the European Union’s Renewable Energy Directive, the Roundtable on Sustainable Biomaterials, and the International Organization for Standardization. These cases allow us to analyze how the co-production of sustainability science responds to problems of epistemic jurisdiction in the global regulatory order. First, different problems of epistemic jurisdiction beset different standard-setting bodies, and these problems shape both the content of regulatory science and the procedures designed to make it authoritative. Second, in order to produce global regulatory science, technical bodies must manage an array of conflicting imperatives – including scientific virtue, due process and the need to recruit adoptees to perpetuate the standard. At different levels of governance, standard drafters struggle to balance loyalties to country, to company or constituency and to the larger project of internationalization. Confronted with these sometimes conflicting pressures, actors across the standards system quite self-consciously maneuver to build or retain authority for their forum through a combination of scientific adjustment and political negotiation. Third, the evidentiary demands of regulatory science in global administrative spaces are deeply affected by 1) a market for standards, in which firms and states can choose the cheapest sustainability certification, and 2) the international trade regime, in which the long shadow of WTO law exerts a powerful disciplining function.

 

Friday, 23 March, 2018 / 14.30 – 16.30

École de droit, Sciences Po, 13 rue de l’Université, 75007 Paris

Meeting Room (4th floor – room 410T)

 

IMPORTANT:

Due to security measures, access to Sciences Po buildings is restricted.

If you intend to attend the seminar, please send an email to filipe.silva@sciencespo.fr

indicating your full name. Security officers will be provided with the list of participants.

Do not forget to bring a VALID ID.

The (private) politics of (legal) space – PILAGG programme for this academic year REVEALED!

Dear friends of PILAGG and private international law,

We are delighted to confirm that PILAGG seminars are back! The overarching theme of this year’s debate series is The (private) politics of (legal) space.

In case you are wondering what is that supposed to mean, please note that we will be focusing on narratives of international law and histories of global space. We will discuss exciting legal issues, such as spatial dynamics of accumulation (histories of international law and capitalism); we will try to identify the gender of space (identities, transnational communities) and the frontiers of human rights ; we will also touch upon the external and internal space (and global legal pluralism); and rediscover the local and the global (new translocalities) ; we will look closely at the cultural space and its tensions between homogenization and heterogenization ; « scapes » or globalized mental pictures of the social world (Appadurai) ; migration and border control AND MORE!

A fascinating strand of thought in this respect comes from Mariana Valverde ‘s Chronotopes of Law, in which she explores Jurisdiction, Scale and Governance (Routledge 2015).

Consider the following : (p82) : « struggles that historically and in the present are waged in a quiet and legalistic manner as fights about jurisdiction actually involve – and end up deciding – much larger extra-legal issues of power and authority ». … « jurisidction can be mor generally dscribed, from a sociolegal ,perspective, as ‘the governance of legal governance’ «   (p83)… « It would be highly inconvenient for the smooth functioning of the law if the how of governance, the qualitative question, were explicitly asked…(p84). The law of jurisdiction, in other words, … is a quite magical power to depoliticize governance » (p.84).

These observations come within a highly innovative framework for analysis of the spatio-temporal workings of law and governance.

We are still in a process of putting together all the bits and pieces for our upcoming events. But, as a TEASER, please find below the first draft of our programme (careful, this is subject to change).

– October 6th : Presentation and opening session (Legal definitions of space)

– October 13th : Darren ROSENBLUM

October 22nd : Geneviève SAUMIER : The Frontiers of Human Rights (a Canadian perspective) ***CONFIRMED

- November : Filipe de SILVA : Historical Capitalism and International law ***CONFIRMED

– November : Gunter FRANKENBERG

– December : Guillame LeBLANC

SO SAVE THE DATE !!

2016 ASADIP Meeting, University of Buenos Aires, 10 – 11 November

2016 ASADIP Meeting

Asociación Americana de Derecho Internacional Privado organised the 2016 Meeting hosted by the University of Buenos Aires, on 10 – 11 November 2016. The opening keynote lecture on the topic “Do the Hague Principles on Choice of Law in International Commercial Contracts bring any change?” given by Professor Katharina Boele-Woelki, Dean of Bucerius Law School, was introduced by Professor Diego P. Fernández Arroyo from Sciences Po Ecole de Droit. 

 

Program

Wednesday, November 9

20:00 – Cocktail offered by The Hague Conference on Private International Law

 

Thursday, November 10

8:45 – 9:00 – Welcome remarks

  • Mónica Pinto (Buenos Aires, Head of Law School of University of Buenos Aires (UBA).
  • José A. Moreno Rodríguez (Asunción, President of ASADIP)

9:00 – 9:30 – Opening keynote lecture

Katharina Boele-Woelki (Hamburg): “Do the Hague Principles on Choice of Law in International Commercial Contracts bring any change?”

Introduced by Diego P. Fernández Arroyo (Paris)

9:30 – 11:00 – Debate: Who fears non-state legislation for the regulation of international contracts? 

  • Ralf Michaels (Duke)
  • Lauro Gama Jr (Rio de Janeiro)
  • Geneviève Saumier (Montreal)
  • Eugenio Hernández-Bretón (Caracas)

Moderated by Francisco Amallo (Buenos Aires)

11:00 – 11.30 – Break

11:30 – 12:45 – Regulation of international contracts: different options in recent Latin American legislation

  • Pablo Debuchy (Asunción)
  • María Elsa Uzal (Buenos Aires)
  • Gilberto Boutin (Panama)
  • Carlos Odriozola Mariscal (Mexico City)

Moderated by Virginia Aguilar (Mexico City)

12:45 – 14:45 – Lunch

14:45 – 16:15 – The future of international regulation of international contracts

  • Mario A. Oyarzábal (Buenos Aires)
  • Hans van Loon (The Hague)
  • José Angelo Estrella Faria (UNIDROIT, Rome)
  • Sandrine Clavel (Versailles)

Moderated by Dante Negro (Washington DC – OAS)

16:15 – 16:45 – Break

16:45 – 18:15 – Debate: Is the 1980 Vienna Convention on Contracts for the CISG properly applied?

  • Alejandro M. Garro (New York)
  • Alberto Zuppi (Buenos Aires)
  • Franco Ferrari (New York)
  • Jorge Oviedo Albán (Bogota)
  • Carolina Iud (Buenos Aires)

Moderated by José Luis Marín (Medellín)

18:15 – 19:15 – Contractualization of secured transactions

  • Spyridon Bazinas (Vienna, UNCITRAL)
  • Paula María All (Santa Fe)

Moderated by Daniela Vargas (Río de Janeiro)

19:15 – Cocktail offered by the Law School of the University of Buenos Aires (UBA)              

  

Friday, November 11 

09:30 – 11:00 – Interpretation of international contracts by judges and arbitrators

  • María Susana Najurieta (Buenos Aires)
  • Paul Arrighi (Montevideo)
  • Cristian Conejero Roos (Santiago)
  • María Lilia Díaz Cordero (Buenos Aires)

Moderated by Verónica Sandler Obregón (Buenos Aires)

11:00 – 11:30 – Break

11:30 – 13:00 – Debate: Judges or arbitrators for the resolution of international contractual disputes?

  • Eduardo Vescovi (Montevideo)
  • Marilda Rosado (Rio de Janeiro)
  • José Alfredo Martínez de Hoz (h) (Buenos Aires)
  • Pedro Saghy (Caracas)
  • Margie Jaime (Panama)

Moderated by Máximo Bomchil (Buenos Aires)

13:00 – 15:00 – Lunch

15:00 – 16:30 – Weak parties and contractual balance

  • Claudia Madrid Martínez (Caracas)
  • Juan José Obando (San José)
  • Mariela Rabino (Buenos Aires)
  • Luciane Klein Vieira (Campinas)
  • Paula Serra Freire (Caracas)
  • Juan José Cerdeira (Buenos Aires)

Moderated by Ana Elizabeth Villalta (San Salvador)

16:30 – 17:00 – Break

17:00 – 18:30 – Debate: Are there or should there be “Latin American” specificities in the law of international contracts?

  • Julio César Rivera (Buenos Aires)
  • Nadia de Araujo (Rio de Janeiro)
  • Roberto Ruiz Díaz Labrano (Asunción)
  • Aníbal Sierralta Ríos (Lima)
  • Pedro Mendoza Montano (Guatemala)

Moderated by Ricardo Acevedo Peralta (San Salvador)

18:30 – 19:00 – Closing keynote lecture:

Jürgen Basedow (Hamburg): “A theory of party autonomy”

Introduced by Didier Opertti Badán (Montevideo)

19:30 – Reception hosted by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Worship of Argentina