Wednesday, 23 Jan: Book Club – Tamar Herzog “A Short History of European Law”

PILAGG WILL HOST AN EXCLUSIVE EVENT OF THE 2019 SPRING SEMESTER WITH PROFESSORS TAMAR HERZOG on her book, “A short history of european law” WITH DISCUSSANTs, PROfESSORs Simona Cerutti and jerome sgard

23 Jan / 17 – 18 H

Room 410 T – Meeting Room

Sciences Po Law School, 13 rue de l’université, 75007 Paris

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FOR AN ABSTRACT:

To many observers, European law seems like the endpoint of a mostly random walk through history. Certainly the trajectory of legal systems in the West over the past 2,500 years is far from self-evident. In A Short History of European Law, Tamar Herzog offers a new road map that reveals underlying patterns and unexpected connections. By identifying what European law was, where its iterations could be found, who was allowed to make and implement it, and what the results were, she ties legal norms to their historical circumstances, and allows readers to grasp their malleability and fragility.

Herzog describes how successive European legal systems built upon one another, from ancient times through the establishment and growth of the European Union. Roman law formed the backbone of each configuration, though the way it was understood, used, and reshaped varied dramatically from one century and place to the next. Only by considering Continental civil law and English common law together do we see how they drew from and enriched this shared tradition.

Expanding the definition of Europe to include its colonial domains, Herzog explains that British and Spanish empires in the New World were not only recipients of European legal traditions but also incubators of new ideas. Their experiences, as well as the constant tension between overreaching ideas and naive localism, explain how European law refashioned itself as the epitome of reason and as a system with potentially global applications.

 IMPORTANT:
DUE TO SECURITY MEASURES, ACCESS TO SCIENCES PO BUILDINGS IS RESTRICTED.
IF YOU INTEND TO ATTEND THE SEMINAR, PLEASE SEND AN EMAIL TO PILAGG@SCIENCESPO.FR
INDICATING YOUR FULL NAME. SECURITY OFFICERS WILL BE PROVIDED WITH THE LIST OF PARTICIPANTS.
DO NOT FORGET TO BRING A VALID ID.

Friday, 7 Dec: Book Talk – Samuel Moyn “Not Enough: Human Rights in an Unequal World”

PILAGG WILL HOST ITS FOURTH EVENT OF THE 2018-2019 ACADEMIC YEAR WITH PROFESSORS KERRY RITTICH, Jeremy Perelman, AND ROBERT WAI ON Samuel Moyn’s “Not Enough: HUman rights in an Unequal world”

7 Dec / 12:30 – 14:30

Room 410 T – Meeting Room

Sciences Po Law School, 13 rue de l’université, 75007 Paris

For an abstract and topics of discussion:

Human rights is now established as the universal language of social justice including across realms of international law and global governance.  But in an era in which concerns about economic inequality take centre stage, there are pressing questions about how well ‘the last utopia’ advances claims rooted in distributive justice. How does the language of human rights shape the forms of equality that we pursue? What accounts for the parallel rise of human rights and market-centered governance? What role has human rights played in collective aspirations for solidarity, especially in the Global South? What should we expect now as social activists use human rights in their economic struggles with states, international institutions, and private actors?

Samuel Moyn’s recent book, Not Enough: Human Rights in an Unequal World, provides an occasion to reflect anew on the history and context of human rights and its place in struggles for economic justice.

FOR AN INTRODUCTION OF THE BOOK: Moyn – Introduction-Not Enough

 

IMPORTANT:
DUE TO SECURITY MEASURES, ACCESS TO SCIENCES PO BUILDINGS IS RESTRICTED.
IF YOU INTEND TO ATTEND THE SEMINAR, PLEASE COMPLETE THE FORM OR SEND AN EMAIL TO PILAGG@SCIENCESPO.FR
INDICATING YOUR FULL NAME. SECURITY OFFICERS WILL BE PROVIDED WITH THE LIST OF PARTICIPANTS.
DO NOT FORGET TO BRING A VALID ID.

Friday, 23 November: Language and Boundaries

PILAGG WILL HOST ITS THIRD EVENT OF THE 2018-2019 ACADEMIC YEAR WITH PROFESSORS Ruth sefton-green, KERRY RITTICH, and robert wai on THE TOPIC OF “Law’s language, law’s Boundaries: an INterdisciplinary approach”

23 Nov / 12:30 – 14:30

Room 410 T – Meeting Room

Sciences Po Law School, 13 rue de l’université, 75007 Paris

FOR ABSTRACTS OF THE TOPICS OF DISCUSSION:

Ruth Sefton-Green (University Paris I Sorbonne) 

Language as a means of closing and opening doors in law

The relationship and mutual influence between law and language is the driving force behind my enquiry. Language affects law from various perspectives. First, language has been, and no doubt still is, exploited by jurists to keep language within the legal community. It follows that a legal language, or a language of the law, can be used as a deliberate barrier to reserve the law to an elite, as well as to mark out cultural and national boundaries. For instance, the invention of the English common law was constructed, somewhat paradoxically, thanks to the French language. Second, it is often suggested that language creates barriers to understanding other legal systems. To what extent does the structure of a language affect the structure of law? Can we learn law in the ‘wrong’ language? Can linguistic incompetence, i.e. not knowing the language, preclude us from understanding another law? Overriding theories of untranslatability, I will explore the idea that comparative law is an eye-opener and an opportunity to cross thresholds, in order to move beyond fixed or conventional understandings and create new ones through a meta-language.

Kerry Rittich (University of Toronto)

Then and Now – Informal Work through the Lens of Colonial Labour Market Governance

Informal work has always been marginal to the discipline of labour law, despite the fact that at a global level it encompasses most of the work actually performed. A confluence of events – among them, the transnationalization of production, the rise of precarious, contractualized forms of work, and the assault on organized labour – has put the discipline in crisis and its conventional focus on the employment relationship in question. At the same time, labour market reforms and other governance norms at the national, international and transnational levels are intensifying the crises of work and exacerbating economic inequality.

As the boundaries of the field are being questioned and redrawn, it can be revealing to trace the continuities between contemporary imperatives to formalize informal labour and enhance productivity at work and colonial endeavours to create a wage labour force habituated to market norms, demands and conditions. What narratives of progress undergird these endeavours? How are legal technologies such as contractual forms employed to effect the transition to modernity? How are freedom and coercion for workers imagined in these contractual relationships, especially in the context of (countervailing) demands to ensure continuous increases in productivity? What do colonial labour market histories and governance projects suggest about the ensuing consequences for efficiency and distributive justice, economic growth and progress in human welfare and social cohesion?

Robert Wai (Osgoode Hall Law School, York University)

Liberal and Post-Liberal Internationalist Policy Discourses in Transnational Economic Law

How are the boundaries of territory and jurisdiction constituted through the language of law? One focus in my research has been the way in which this is resolved through the deployment of policy discourses in fields of transnational economic law, including private international law, international trade law, and international investment law. In particular, the harnessing and reception of interdisciplinary insights into law through the reasoning/justification of legal decision-makers, including legislators, judges/arbitrators, and public officials, involves a selective reception of the insights from the extralegal disciplines such as economics, international relations, and ethics. I have earlier argued that the supportive reception during the 1990s of globalization into many areas of law, most strikingly in neoliberal reform associated with the Washington Consensus, could be understood as being justified based on a series of liberal internationalist policy analytics taken from economics, international relations, and ethics. The slogan “commerce, cooperation, cosmopolitanism” could summarize this stage. Since then, the liberal internationalist policy consensus has clearly become more contested. What is the nature of interdisciplinary policy discourse now in transnational economic law, and what follows from the change for the legal language of territory and jurisdiction?

IMPORTANT:
DUE TO SECURITY MEASURES, ACCESS TO SCIENCES PO BUILDINGS IS RESTRICTED.
IF YOU INTEND TO ATTEND THE SEMINAR, PLEASE COMPLETE THE FORM OR SEND AN EMAIL TO PILAGG@SCIENCESPO.FR
INDICATING YOUR FULL NAME. SECURITY OFFICERS WILL BE PROVIDED WITH THE LIST OF PARTICIPANTS.
DO NOT FORGET TO BRING A VALID ID.

Friday, 19 October: Dominus Mundi by Professor PG Monateri

PILAGG will host its second event of the 2018-2019 academic year with professor Pier Giuseppe monateri on his latest book, “Dominus mundi: Politcal sublime and the world order”

19 Oct / 12:30 – 14:30

Room 410 T – Meeting Room

Sciences Po Law School, 13 rue de l’université, 75007 Paris

 

FOR AN ABSTRACT OF THE SEMINAR AND TOPICS OF DISCUSSION:

This monograph makes a seminal contribution to existing literature on the importance of Roman law in the development of political thought in Europe. In particular it examines the expression ‘dominus mundi’, following it through the texts of the medieval jurists – the Glossators and Post-Glossators – up to the political thought of Hobbes. Understanding the concept of dominus mundi sheds light on how medieval jurists understood ownership of individual things; it is more complex than it might seem; and this book investigates these complexities. The book also o ers important new insights into Thomas Hobbes, especially with regard to the end of dominus mundi and the replacement by Leviathan. Finally, the book has important relevance for contemporary political theory. With fading of political diversity Monateri argues “that the actual setting of globalisation represents the reappearance of the Ghost of the Dominus Mundi, a political refoulé – repressed – a reappearance of its sublime nature, and a struggle to restore its universal legitimacy, and take its place.” In making this argument, the book adds an important original vision to current debates in legal and political philosophy.

IMPORTANT:
DUE TO SECURITY MEASURES, ACCESS TO SCIENCES PO BUILDINGS IS RESTRICTED.
IF YOU INTEND TO ATTEND THE SEMINAR, PLEASE COMPLETE THE FORM or SEND AN EMAIL TO PILAGG@SCIENCESPO.FR
INDICATING YOUR FULL NAME. SECURITY OFFICERS WILL BE PROVIDED WITH THE LIST OF PARTICIPANTS.
DO NOT FORGET TO BRING A VALID ID.

Friday, 28 September: Encounters with Alterity in Legal Form by Professor Horatia Muir Watt

PILAGG will kick off the 2018-2019 ACADEMIC year with Professor Horatia Muir Watt on her latest book, “Encounters with Alterity in Legal Form”

28 Sept/ 12:30 – 14:30

Room 410 T – Meeting Room

Sciences Po Law School, 13 rue de l’université, 75007 Paris

 

FOR AN ABSTRACT OF THE SEMINAR AND TOPICS OF DISCUSSION:

A core question for global or post-monist jurisprudence is law’s modes of encounters with alterity. Indeed, the “global turn” in law is not limited, as it would sometimes seem, to a tightening of its own structural linkages with the economy, but involves constant exposure or interactions with foreign societies, cultures and ideologies. One response in legal form to ubiquitous otherness, including cultural difference, can be found by joining up with various strands of contemporary interdisciplinary scholarship in exploring the insights to be found in the specific methodologies of private international law. The aesthetic, ethical or political underpinnings of the various modes of reasoning though which, in the Western world, law understands, and reacts to, extraneous norms and values can then be probed and assessed. In other words, the focus here is on the interdisciplinary ecology of those legal forms that embody a certain relationship to foreign laws and other forms of normativity. Post-monist legal approaches to otherness appear here as a “dangerous method” that leads to a decentering of the self, a moment of void at the point of encounter of difference, a suspension of judgment. While such a method leaves behind the comfortable linearity of legal monism, a look towards private international law’s specific intellectual schemes show that the ensuing vertigo is to be embraced as a form of enrichment of law’s horizons and modes of reasoning.

FOR AN INTRODUCTORY EXCERPT TO THE BOOK:

 Introduction

IMPORTANT:
Due to security measures, access to Sciences Po buildings is restricted.
If you intend to attend the seminar, please send an email to PILAGG@SCIENCESPO.FR
indicating your full name. Security officers will be provided with the list of participants.
Do not forget to bring a VALID ID.

Friday, 13 April: Who is called a foreigner? Reflections on hospitality, by Professor Guillaume le Blanc

Who is called a foreigner? Reflections on hospitality

 Professor Guillaume le Blanc

Professeur de Philosophie à l’Université de Paris Est Créteil

Friday, April 13 / 12.15 – 14.00

This Pilagg seminar animated by Professor le Blanc will revolve around naming a life a foreign life. Stranger is never recognized as a true subject because he or she is always denationalized and, therefore, made other. Thus, the aim of this seminar is to show that hospitality is not only a gesture of help for someone who is in need. It must be considered both as an ethical and political value whose claim comes from critical considerations on belonging to a nation.

  Friday April 13, 2018

Room 410 T – Meeting Room

Sciences Po Law School, 13 rue de l’université, 75007 Paris

  

IMPORTANT:

Due to security measures, access to Sciences Po buildings is restricted.

If you intend to attend the seminar, please send an email to filipe.silva@sciencespo.fr indicating your full name. Security officers will be provided with the list of participants.

Do not forget to bring a VALID ID.

 

Historical Capitalism and International Law – Colloque Junior du CIERA – Young Scholars’ Conference Program

Sciences Po, 18 and 19 January 2018

IMPORTANT: If you intend to attend the conference, please register at: https://www.eventbrite.fr/e/historical-capitalism-and-international-law-tickets-41426110612

Conference venues access:

Amphithéâtre Erignac (13, rue de l’Université) – Building J

Salle Goguel (56, rue des Saints Pères) – Building B, access through building A (27, rue Saint Guillaume)

Metro stations nearby: Saint-Germain-des-Prés, line 4 Sèvres-Babylone, lines 10 and 12 Rue du Bac, line 12

Thursday, 18 January 2018 Amphithéâtre Erignac (13, rue de l’Université –Paris 7ème)

12:30 – 13:00 Conference registration

13:00 – 13:30 Presentation and welcome notes

13:30 – 15:00 Keynote address : Rémi Bachand, Law Professor at Université du Québec à Montréal, “Capitalism, Imperialism and International Law”

15:00 – 15:15 Coffee break

15:15 – 17:15 Nikolas Karmis, Paris II Panthéon-Assas, “The Ideological Interpretation of the Article 16 of the Covenant of the League of Nations by the German Doctrine” Eric Loefflad, University of Kent, “Occupation, Civilisation, and the Protection of European Property: A World-Historical Perspective on the International Illegality of Territorial Conquest” Commentator: Sören Zimmermann, Goethe-Universität, Frankfurt/M

17:15 – 17:30 Coffee break

17:30 – 19:30 Kanad Bagchi, Max Planck Institute for Comparative Public Law and International Law, “To Capital Controls and Back: Re-Embedding Global Capitalism Through International Law” Johanna Gautier, Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies, “Financial Deregulation in the 1980s-1990s: A New Market for Territorial and Institutional Competition” Commentator: Robin Caballero, Humboldt Universität zu Berlin / Paris I Panthéon-Sorbonne

20:00 Dinner

Friday, 19 January 2018 Salle Goguel (56, rue des Saints Pères – Paris 7ème)

9:00 – 11:00 Aikaterini Grymaneli, Université Paris II Panthéon-Assas, “Capitalism Expansion and the Law of the Sea: The Example of the Exploitation and Conservation of Areas Beyond National Jurisdiction” Dudi Rulliadi, Melbourne Law School, “From Dutch Colonialism to US Developmentalism: Capitalism and the Dynamics of Indonesian Law and Policy on Economic Development from Independence to the New Order Era” Commentator: Milan Tahraoui, Max Planck Institute for Comparative Public Law and International Law

11:00 – 11:15 Coffee break

11:15 – 13:15 Olaoye Kehinde Folake, Chinese University of Hong Kong, “Empire, Capital and Protection of Foreign Investment: Historical Origins of Transnational Investment Law in Africa” Anam Soomro, Berlin Graduate School for Transnational Studies, “A Critical Inquiry into Freedom of Movement: Race, Colonialism and the Making of International Law” Commentator: Tim Wihl, Humboldt Universität zu Berlin

13:15 – 14:30 Lunch

14:30 – 16:30 Filipe Antunes Madeira da Silva, Sciences Po Law School, “How the Putumayo Was Won: Sovereignty and Property in the Rubber Lands” Claire Debucquois, Columbia Law School, “Braudel in Brazil: The Merchant, the Prince, and the [Law of the] Land” Commentator: Alberto Rinaldi, Sciences Po Law School

16:30 – 16:45 Coffee break

16:45 – 19:00 Interdisciplinary round-table : “Franco-German Looks into Historical Capitalism and International Law : Exploring Geographical and Disciplinary Boundaries” Discussants: Monique Chemillier-Gendrau (To be confirmed – Professeure émérite, Université Paris Diderot – Paris 7), Pierre Gervais (Université Sorbonne Nouvelle – Paris 3), Claire Lemercier (Centre de Sociologie des Organisations – Sciences Po) and Ingo Venske (Universiteit Van Amsterdam)

REMINDER – Last Pilagg conference of 2017 is taking place TODAY

Dear fellow Pilaggists and private international law enthusiasts,

As you might know, our last Pilagg conference of 2017 is taking place TODAY! This will be a very special occasion indeed, not only because we will say goodbye to the (very productive) Pilagg year 2017, but more importantly, because we will have two speakers who will address the fascinating and topical issue of Legal Constructions of Space and Forms of Life.

Veronica Corcodel and Toni Marzal, both members of the FOLIE group will talk about Legally constructed migrant forms of life (with a focus on the Calais camps) and the Territorial scope of application of the EU law.

So, save the date, and make sure you attend the seminar! If enough people are interested, the discussion can continue after the official end-time, with a nice glass of mulled wine. We are looking forward to seeing you all!

Friday, December 15th, 2017 / 14.00 – 17.00

École de droit, Sciences Po, 13 rue de l’Université, 75007 Paris

Meeting Room (4th floor – room 410T)

IMPORTANT:

Due to security measures, access to Sciences Po buildings is restricted.

If you intend to attend the seminar, please send an email to filipe.silva@sciencespo.fr

indicating your full name. Security officers will be provided with the list of participants.

Do not forget to bring a VALID ID.

Friday, 15 December – Joint seminar on Legal Constructions of Space and Forms of Life by Toni Marzal and Veronica Corcodel

Joint seminar on Legal Constructions of Space and Forms of Life

Friday, December 15th 2017 / 14.00 – 17.00

 

Antonio Marzal

Maître de Conférences à la Sorbonne & Member of FOLIE

&

Veronica Corcodel

Postdoctoral Fellow at Sciences Po & Member of FOLIE

 

Antonio Marzal: FOLIE and the territorial scope of application of EU law

The topic I have chosen to examine from the perspective of FOLIE is that of the territorial scope of application of EU law. At its simplest, it is the issue that arises where a situation is only partially or even tenuously connected to the European territory, or where it is connected both to the EU and the legal systems of third States. Problems in this area, like in many others, are solved by relying on universal values, by conceiving EU law as a vector for those values, and by guaranteeing its effectiveness. This means that, in principle, territoriality plays very little role. Rather than firmly grounded in a certain geography or a localised community, EU law possesses the abstract qualities of pure movement or energy: its effects are certainly felt locally, but EU law itself has no such grounding. If we take seriously, however, the ideas behind FOLIE project (that is, that EU law is necessarily local, that it is both reflective and constitutive of a way of life), it becomes possible to turn this area of the law upside down and show, not only that the question of the applicability of EU law can be alternatively understood as who is and who is out and what it means to be an insider, but furthermore that the EU law already is based on such an understanding, even if reluctantly and vaguely articulated and seeking cover under the convenient language of values, extraterritoriality and effet utile”.

 

Veronica Corcodel: Legally constructed migrant forms of life: Calais as a space of contested suspension

This presentation will explore the relationship between law and migrant lives through the example of the Calais camp. It will start with a reflection on how the notion of forms of life, developed mainly in philosophical and literary works, can be useful for approaching this question. Defined as a bundle of socially and culturally shaped practices that constitute – and are constituted by – ways of living, this notion puts in the forefront the issue of life possibilities. If law is to be understood as one of these practices, the idea of forms of life allows tackling the relationship between law and migrants’ projects of social and economic lives in “foreign” countries. In the context of the Calais camp, as this presentation will show, legal arrangements both consolidate the suspension of migrants’ life projects and allow contesting it. In this sense, Calais appears as a legally constructed space of contested suspension. Such a vision runs counter reductive understandings of the camp as created “outside law” or as merely oppressive.

 

Friday, December 15th, 2017 / 14.00 – 17.00

École de droit, Sciences Po, 13 rue de l’Université, 75007 Paris

Meeting Room (4th floor – room 410T)

 IMPORTANT:

Due to security measures, access to Sciences Po buildings is restricted.

If you intend to attend the seminar, please send an email to filipe.silva@sciencespo.fr

indicating your full name. Security officers will be provided with the list of participants.

Do not forget to bring a VALID ID.